People

Rachel is currently a PhD Candidate in Linguistics at the University of Alberta and lives in Edmonton with her partner Alberto and their children Sara and Jenny. Her research focuses include language endangerment and sustainability, linguistic racism and discrimination, language and social justice, sociolinguistics, language variation, and Totonacan languages (Mexico).

Julia Schillo (BA, University of British Columbia) is a Research Assistant focused on community-based language revitalization and documentation, as well as design-based supports for the orthographies of Indigenous languages. She has a background in graphic design, and studied First Nations and Endangered Languages and Linguistics at UBC. Much of her current work focuses on how typography functions for Indigenous languages. She also works on language revitalization and documentation with speakers of Secwespemctsín (Shuswap).

Karie Hanson graduated from the University of Alberta with a Bachelor of Arts in Recreation, Sport, and Tourism. She will be working with the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies temporarily as the Senior Program Assistant, and is happy to be here and learn about this Department.

Fiona Campbell is a PhD candidate in Linguistics at McGill University and a Sessional Lecturer with the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program. Her doctoral research at McGill University is focused primarily onphonetics (speech sounds), language contact, and sociolinguistics (why people say what they do the way they do in particular contexts).

Connie Wintels is the Administrator of the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies (CIS) and is responsible for the daily operation of the Institute.

Aynur Kadir is an Indigenous Uyghur scholar, filmmaker and curator with a research focus on the documentation, conservation and revitalization of Indigenous cultures and languages. Her work bridges the gap between Indigenous studies in Canada and in Asia. Her research interests are in global indigeneity from the Uyghur in China to Coast Salish and Six Nations in Canada; transnational Indigenous diplomacy; and the safeguarding and revitalization of languages and cultural heritage through digital technology and collaborative initiatives.

Sarah is the Senior Program Assistant (Students) for the Institute for Critical Indigenous Studies. She is a recent FNIS graduate and was raised on Anishinaabe territory in Thunder Bay.

Coll Thrush (PhD, Washington, 2002) is a historian of place, looking at the intersections between Indigenous histories and the histories of settler colonialism. His first book, Native Seattle: Histories from the Crossing-Over Place (2007, second edition released in 2017), examined the links between urban and Indigenous histories in the Northwest’s largest city, while his most recent book, Indigenous London: Native Travellers at the Heart of Empire (2016), reframes the history of the British Empire’s capital through the experiences of Indigenous children, women, and men who journeyed there, willingly or otherwise.

Elder Larry Grant from the Musqueam Nation is an Adjunct Professor in the First Nations and Endangered Languages Program, in which he co-teaches the introductory hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓ (Central Coast Salish) course. He is also Elder-in-Residence at the First Nations House of Learning and Consultant for the Musqueam Language and Culture Department.

From 2014-2018, Kaeleigh served as the Program Assistant for FNEL. Kaeleigh Hiebert is Kwakwa̱ka̱’wakw from Campbell River on Vancouver Island. She completed her M.Ed in Indigenous Pedagogies and Knowledges at UBC (2014) and is a graduate of the NITEP program.